www.bhaumikdave.comPersonal Website
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ABOUT

PERSONAL DETAILS
8032, Zurich
mail@bhaumikdave.com
+41 79104 9881
Hallo, I am a researcher (life sciences), nature lover and equal parts gadget tinkerer. Welcome to my personal website. Please feel free to go through my resumé and be sure to write back to me if I have piqued your interest! Available as freelance

BIO

ABOUT ME

My friends describe me as a very calm and patient person by nature. They consider me a very good story-teller and a person who is very good at selling novel tech. I like to think I have a pioneering attitude to life, always seeking new things to do, or new ways to do old things! As for my take on life, I'm quite ambitious and I suppose I can be a bit of a perfectionist sometimes. But don't worry, I don't take life too seriously! I'm pretty ambitious and have lots of goals I want to achieve. I push myself to the max and really soak up as much of life as I can, whether I'm halfway up a mountain or about to trek the desert.

My plus points? I'm a natural when it comes to technical stuff. What can I say, I'm good with my hands and have quite a logical mind. Tinkering with anything that's a bit technical is always a treat. I like to keep my dreams within my reach and one day I can really see myself settling down in a beautiful modern house in a really nice neighbourhood.

HOBBIES

INTERESTS

Technology enthusiast and a part-time geek. I like to tinker with various DIY projects and often make my own. I particularly like to explore gadgets and machines from inside to their minute details.

I also love nature and therefore make it a point to explore new place often. I like cycling, hiking and catching up with friends at the movies.

FACTS

FACTS ABOUT ME

I can beat-box!

I have been to 21 cities from 7 countries!

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RESUME

EDUCATION
  • 2011
    2016
    ZURICH

    CHEMICAL BIOLOGY - PHD

    UNIVERSITY OF ZURICH

    PhD thesis ‘Metal complex interactions with Metal-modified nucleic acids’, under supervision of Prof. Dr. Roland K. O. Sigel
  • 2008
    2009
    LEICESTER

    CANCER CELL & MOLECULAR BIOLOGY - MSC

    UNIVERSITY OF LEICESTER

    M.Sc. thesis ‘Towards mechanism of action of the adaptor protein CIN85: An inhibitor of PI 3-kinase’, under supervision of Dr. Mark Pfuhl
  • 2003
    2007
    MUMBAI

    BIOTECHNOLOGY - B.TECH

    RAI FOUNDATION COLLEGES

    Bachelor thesis ‘In-Vitro study of genotoxic effect of Servo Agrospray on occupational exposure of farmers & comparative study with respect to extensively used known pesticide: A pilot study’, under supervision of Dr. Bani B Ganguly
ACADEMIC AND PROFESSIONAL POSITIONS
  • 2011
    2016
    ZURICH

    GRADUATE STUDENT RESEARCHER

    SIGEL LABORATORY UNIVERSITY OF ZURICH

    · Interdisciplinary research covering fundamental binding and interaction studies of Light-switch metal complexes with metal-modified nucleic acids as a Doctoral candidate (Team of Roland K. O. Sigel’s Lab) · Conducted and supervised General chemistry practicals and research projects for students enrolled in undergraduate studies. Also developed protocols for sophisticated instruments and trained new members & students to work under sterile lab conditions. · As a part of the European COST Action research team, I was involved in collaborative efforts across various labs within EU to further my research.
  • 2010
    2011
    LEICESTER

    RESEARCH TECHNICIAN

    HENRY WELLCOME LABORATORIES OF STRUCTURAL BIOLOGY

    · As a Research Technician in Prof Mark Carr’s group, I studied protein- protein interactions using various biophysical techniques such as NMR spectroscopy, Circular Dichroism spectroscopy, FPLC methods, and also applied various molecular biology techniques to produce recombinant protein. · Responsible for developing reports, scientific protocols and general lab maintenance.
  • 2009
    2009
    LEICESTER

    LAB DEMONSTRATOR

    UNIVERSITY OF LEICESTER

    · Conducted and supervised cell and molecular biology practicals for first year Masters students.
  • 2009
    2010
    LEICESTER

    TEAM MEMBER

    K L VENTURES

    · This part time job entailed taking phone calls, dealing with customers, till management, answering telephone enquiries, assisting in pizza make-line, stock taking, and overall store management both during busy and normal hours.
  • 2008
    2008
    SURAT

    CUSTOMER RELATIONSHIP EXECUTIVE

    LIFECELL INDIA

    · Conducted high quality customer care and client interactions. Product and service presentations to clients and customers with market research. Also responsible for data entry & management.
HONORS AND AWARDS
  • 2014
    2014
    ZURICH

    POSTER PRIZE - EUROBIC 12

    UNIVERSITY OF ZURICH

    Won the EuroBIC 12 poster prize for my contribution "Influence of Hg(II) on the intercalation of [Ru(bpy)2(dppz)]2+ to DNA"
  • 2014
    2014
    LOUVAIN-LA-NEUVE

    SUMMER SCHOOL GRANT

    COST ACTION CM1105

    Selected to participate in the Summer School "Chemistry of Metals in Biological Systems", Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium, September 7th to 14th 2014
  • 2008
    2010
    LEICESTER

    MASTERS WITH DISTINCTION

    UNIVERSITY OF LEICESTER

    Awarded Master of Science with Distinction
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SKILLS

RESEARCH & TECHNICAL
BIOMOLECULAR STRUCTURE & MECHANISM > Experiences in UV-Vis, Fluorescence, CD & NMR Spectroscopy (Sample preparation, basic instrument control and data analysis). RNA transcription, SDS-PAGE & Electrophoresis, working with RNA, DNA & proteins under sterile lab conditions. Worked with selectively fluorescent metal complexes that bind non-covalently to nucleic acids.
LEVEL : ADVANCED EXPERIENCE : 5 YEARS
Spectroscopy Nucleic acid Chemistry Biological Inorganic Chemistry Molecular Biology
MOLECULAR BIOLOGY > Cell culture, Cloning, PCR, Competent cell preparation, transfection/transformation, Protein expression (Using Bacterial expression systems), Protein isolation and Protein purification (Chromatography techniques), Gel-filtration (preparative and analytical), Analytical ultracentrifugation
LEVEL : EXPERT EXPERIENCE : 8 YEARS
Protein bioengineering Chromatography Cell culture PCR Modified-DNA/ RNA
PLANT & ANIMAL TISSUE CULTURE > Plant and animal tissue culture, Cloning, SNP analysis, PCR, cell growth assay, Recombinant DNA techniques, basic microbiology, Microscopy techniques (Light, Phase-contrast, con-focal and fluorescence) and basic industrial biotechnology techniques.
LEVEL : ADVANCED EXPERIENCE : 2 YEARS
PCR Cloning Cell culture Microbiology Recombinant DNA
COMPUTING SKILLS
WEB | COMPUTING HARDWARE & SOFTWARE > Sophisticated computer skills and knowledge, Hands-on knowledge about computing hardware, software & office applications. Actively learning about internet and web applications. Special software: TopSpinTM 3.2 (Bruker BioSpin, NMR), NMR analysis performed using CCPNMR ANALYSIS software (versions 2.0.6.1 and 2.0.7) and Sparky version 3.115. Graphical analysis software Origin® Pro (OriginLab Corporation). Microsoft Office applications, and good knowledge about iOS, Mac OS X, Windows 7- 10, Android & Linux operating systems.
LEVEL : INTERMEDIATE EXPERIENCE : +10 YEARS
Sparky TopSpin 3.2 Origin Pro (OriginLab) Microsoft Office OS X Windows Linux
BUSINESS SKILLS
CUSTOMER RELATIONS & MARKETING > Involved in High quality customer care, client calls and setting up appointments, also responsible for presenting (demos & product info) to clients and customers. Data entry & management using Microsoft Office (Word, PowerPoint and Excel)
LEVEL : BEGINNER EXPERIENCE : +1 YEARS
CRM Data Management Microsoft Office
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PUBLICATIONS

PUBLICATIONS LIST
22 Aug 2014

INTERCALATION OF [Ru(bpy)2(dppz)]2+ TO Hg(II)-MODIFIED DNA

ZURICH - SWITZERLAND

Poster presentation at the 2nd International Symposium on Functional Metal Complexes that Bind to Biomolecules, Zurich, Switzerland, August 2014

ConferencesPoster Presentation Bhaumik S. Dave, Silke Johannsen, Roland K. O. Sigel

INTERCALATION OF [Ru(bpy)2(dppz)]2+ TO Hg(II)-MODIFIED DNA

Bhaumik S. Dave, Silke Johannsen, Roland K. O. Sigel ConferencesPoster Presentation

In DNA, the hydrogen bonds between the complementary nucleobases can be replaced by coordinative bonds to transition metal ions to generate so called metal- mediated base pairs[1]. Since the metal ions are arranged along the helical axis of the nucleic acids, metal-modified nucleic acids are therefore expected to possess better conductive properties than their natural counterparts. Hence, they can serve as building blocks for nanowires[2]. The best studied metal mediated base-pair is the Thymine-HgII-Thymine base pair. In this case the rather unstable thymine-thymine mismatch is strongly stabilised by the coordination of one HgII ion between the two opposite N3 nitrogens of the thymine-thymine base pair. In the absence of HgII ions, the mismatch region adopts an unusual non-helical fold that upon addition of HgII converts into a stable B-helical conformation[3]. To prove if such metal-modified nucleic acids have indeed enhanced conducting properties we want to set-up photoexcited charge transfer experiments using the well-known metallointercalator [Ru(bpy)2(dppz)]2+ as electron donor. However, as a first step we have to characterise the intercalation of this complex to metal-modified nucleic acids. Therefore we investigate the binding interaction of the racemic [Ru(bpy)2(dppz)]2+ complex and the separated Δ and Λ enantiomers to a 17bp 2(T-T)-HgII-modified DNA using spectroscopic techniques like UV-VIS, CD, Fluorescence and NMR. To directly observe the influence of HgII ions bound to DNA, we compared these results to the analogously obtained data of the corresponding natural and the 2(T-T) mismatched 17bp duplexes. As the emission of [Ru(bpy)2(dppz)]2+ is very sensitive to the binding pocket on the DNA, changes in emission can reflect very small variation in the helical conformation[4]. Indeed we observed for the HgII-modified DNA a much lower emission compared to the natural and 2(T-T) mismatched sequences. However, we cannot differentiate if changes are due to small distortions of the overall structure, or due to a direct interaction of the HgII ions with the metal complex resulting in altered electronic properties.

Acknowledgements Financial support by the University of Zurich and within the COST Action CM1105 is gratefully acknowledged.

References

  1. Takezawa Y, Shionoya M (2012) Acc Chem Res 45:2066-2076
  2. Scharf P, Müller J (2013) ChemPlusChem 78:20–34
  3. Kondo J, Yamada T, Hirose C, Okamoto I, Tanaka Y, Ono A (2014) AngewChem 126: 2417–2420
  4. Lim M H, Song H, Olmon E D, Dervan E E, Barton J K (2009) Inorg Chem48:5392–5397

Third Whole Action Meeting of the COST Action CM1105 Zurich, 22-23 August 2014

23 May 2016

METAL COMPLEX INTERACTIONS WITH METAL-MODIFIED NUCLEIC ACIDS

ZURICH - SWITZERLAND

DISSERTATION zur Erlangung der naturwissenschaftlichen Doktorwürde (Dr. sc. nat.) vorgelegt der Mathematisch-naturwissenschaftlichen Fakultät der Universität Zürich, 2016

Theses Bhaumik S. Dave

METAL COMPLEX INTERACTIONS WITH METAL-MODIFIED NUCLEIC ACIDS

Bhaumik S. Dave Theses
07 Sep 2014

INFLUENCE OF HG(II) ON THE INTERCALATION OF [Ru(bpy)2(dppz)]2+ TO DNA

LOUVAIN-LA-NEUVE - BELGIUM

Poster presentation at the COST ACTION CM1105 Summer School - Chemistry of Metals in Biological Systems, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium, September 2014

Poster PresentationSummer School Bhaumik S. Dave, Silke Johannsen, Roland K. O. Sigel

INFLUENCE OF HG(II) ON THE INTERCALATION OF [Ru(bpy)2(dppz)]2+ TO DNA

Bhaumik S. Dave, Silke Johannsen, Roland K. O. Sigel Poster PresentationSummer School
24 Aug 2014

INFLUENCE OF HG(II) ON THE INTERCALATION OF [Ru(bpy)2(dppz)]2+ TO DNA

ZURICH - SWITZERLAND

Poster Presentation at the 12th European Biological Inorganic Chemistry Conference, Zurich, Switzerland, August 2014

ConferencesPoster Presentation Selected Bhaumik S. Dave, Silke Johannsen, Roland K. O. Sigel

INFLUENCE OF HG(II) ON THE INTERCALATION OF [Ru(bpy)2(dppz)]2+ TO DNA

Bhaumik S. Dave, Silke Johannsen, Roland K. O. Sigel ConferencesPoster Presentation Selected

DNA, due to its robust structural features and unique self-assembly properties, is a very attractive molecule for application in nanotechnology and medicinal technology. Replacing the hydrogen bonds between the complementary nucleobases by coordinative bonds to transition-metal ions generates the so called metal-mediated base pairs[1]. One of the most interesting applications is the usage of these metal-modified biomolecules as building block for nanowires. Metal-modified nucleic acids are expected to possess better conductive properties than their natural counterparts due to the functionalization with metal ions along the helical axis[2]. The best studied metal mediated base-pair is the Thymine-HgII-Thymine base pair. In this case the rather unstable thymine-thymine mismatch is strongly stabilised by the coordination of one HgII ion between the two opposite N3 nitrogens of the thymine-thymine base pair. In the absence of HgII ions, the mismatch region adopts an unusual non-helical fold that upon addition of HgII converts into a stable B-helical conformation[3].

In this study we use the metallointercalator [Ru(bpy)2(dppz)]2+ to observe small structural deviations between a natural, T-T mismatched and a HgII modified 17bp long DNA. The emission properties of the [Ru(bpy)2(dppz)]2+ complex, a well-known DNA Light-switch, are known to be strongly dependent on the intercalation site[4]. We characterised the binding interaction of the racemic [Ru(bpy)2(dppz)]2+ complex and the separated Δ and Λ enantiomers using spectroscopic techniques like UV-VIS, CD, Fluorescence and NMR. Our first results show that the emission is significantly influenced by the presence of HgII ions within the DNA helix. The much lower emission observed for the HgII-modified DNA compared to the natural and T-T mismatched sequences can be twofold. On the one hand, the intercalation can be affected due to small distortions of the overall structure, or due to a direct interaction of the HgII ions with the metal complex resulting in altered electronic properties of the metal complex. Furthermore, we observed a strong difference in the intercalative properties to the different DNA models between the Λ and Δ enantiomers.

Financial support by the University of Zurich and within the COST Action CM1105 is gratefully acknowledged.

References

  1. Takezawa Y, Shionoya M (2012) Acc Chem Res 45:2066-2076
  2. Scharf P, Müller J (2013) ChemPlusChem 78:20–34
  3. Kondo J, Yamada T, Hirose C, Okamoto I, Tanaka Y, Ono A (2014) Angew Chem 126: 2417–2420
  4. Lim M H, Song H, Olmon E D, Dervan E E, Barton J K (2009) Inorg Chem 48:5392–5397
06 Sep 2013

PHOTOINDUCED CHARGE TRANSFER THROUGH METAL-MODIFIED NUCLEIC ACIDS: TOWARDS MOLECULAR WIRES

LAUSANNE - SWITZERLAND

Swiss Chemical Society Fall meeting, Lausanne, September 2013

ConferencesPoster Presentation Bhaumik S. Dave, Silke Johannsen, Roland K. O. Sigel

PHOTOINDUCED CHARGE TRANSFER THROUGH METAL-MODIFIED NUCLEIC ACIDS: TOWARDS MOLECULAR WIRES

Bhaumik S. Dave, Silke Johannsen, Roland K. O. Sigel ConferencesPoster Presentation

The application of nucleic acids as building blocks to generate molecular wires would vastly benefit from their superb self-assembly capacity and well-defined structural features. Unfortunately, the conductivity of natural nucleic acids is insufficient for their direct application in nano-scale elec- tronic architectures. Site specific functionalization of nucleic acids with metal ions can overcome this shortcoming.[1,2]

Our goal is to investigate the electronic properties of metal-modified nucleic acids by photoinduced charge-transfer experiments using metallo- intercalators. These would act as electron donor-acceptor couple binding to metal-modified RNA sequences at specific sites. Our RNA sequences con- tain uracil-uracil miss-matched base pairs that coordinate HgII ions forming U-Hg-U base pairs.[3] Using absorption and emission experiments, we char- acterize the binding of the donor metallointercalator [Ru(bpy)2(dppz)]2+ into our RNA duplexes to reveal exact binding constants. Our recent studies suggest an intercalative binding mode between the light-switch complex and our HgII modified RNA duplexes.

Financial support by the Swiss National Science Foundation, the University of Zur- ich, within the COST Action CM1105 is gratefully acknowledged.

[1] K. Tanaka; M. Shionoya, J. Org. Chem. 1999, 64, 5002-5003.
[2] S. Liu; G. H. Clever; Y. Takezawa; M. Kaneko; K. Tanaka; X. Guo; M.

Shionoya, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2011, 50, 8886-8890.
[3] S. Johannsen; S. Paulus; N. Düpre; J. Müller; R. K. O. Sigel, J. Inorg. Bio-

chem. 2008, 102, 1141-1151.

22 Jul 2013

SETTING UP PHOTOINDUCED CHARGE TRANSFER THROUGH METAL MODIFIED NUCLEIC ACIDS: TOWARDS MOLECULAR WIRES

GRENOBLE - FRANCE

16th International Conference on Bioinorganic Chemistry, Grenoble, July 2013

ConferencesPoster Presentation Bhaumik S. Dave, Silke Johannsen, Roland K. O. Sigel

SETTING UP PHOTOINDUCED CHARGE TRANSFER THROUGH METAL MODIFIED NUCLEIC ACIDS: TOWARDS MOLECULAR WIRES

Bhaumik S. Dave, Silke Johannsen, Roland K. O. Sigel ConferencesPoster Presentation

Nucleic acids are propitious candidates for the use as templates to design molecular wires and magnets on nano-scale. This is mainly attributed to their superb self-assembly properties and robust structural features. Although the conductivity of natural nucleic acids is insufficient for their direct application in nano-scale electronic architectures, the site-specific functionalization of nucleic acids can overcome this shortcoming.1 The formation of metal-mediated base pairs is the most prominent method to insert metal ions in a specific manner along the helix of nucleic acid.2–4

Our goal is to study the electronic properties of such metal-modified nucleic acids. Using metallointercalators as an electron donor-acceptor couple we are setting-up a photoinduced charge transfer experiment with metal-modified RNA duplexes. Our RNA duplexes contain continuous stretches of 2, 3 and 6 uracil-uracil mismatches that form U-HgII-U base pairs upon addition of Hg2+ ions.4 As a first step towards setting-up our experiment, we characterize the binding of the donor metallointercalator [Ru(bpy)2dppz]2+ using absorption and emission experiments. Our data suggests an intercalative mode of binding between the metallointercalator and our Hg2+-modified RNA duplexes. Intercalative binding is a feasible method through which an electron can be injected into the base-stack of nucleic acids without covalently attaching metal complexes to it. These studies are an important step to further development of the charge transfer experiment of metal-modified nucleic acids.

Financial support by the Swiss National Science Foundation (to SJ and RKOS), the University of Zurich, within the COST Action CM1105 is gratefully acknowledged.

 

  1. S. Liu; G. H. Clever; Y. Takezawa; M. Kaneko; K. Tanaka; X. Guo; M. Shionoya, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2011, 50, 8886.
  2. K. Tanaka; M. Shionoya, J. Org. Chem. 1999, 64, 5002.
  3. S. Johannsen; N. Megger; D. Böhme; R. K. O. Sigel; J. Müller, Nat. Chem.2010, 2, 229.
  4. S. Johannsen; S. Paulus; N. Düpre; J. Müller; R. K. O. Sigel, J. Inorg. Biochem. 2008, 102, 1141.

 

 

25 Jun 2013

METAL-MODIFIED NUCLEIC ACID INTERACTIONS WITH METAL COMPLEXES

BARCELONA - SPAIN

Talk given at the 1st International Symposium on Functional Metal Complexes that Bind to Biomolecules, Barcelona, Spain, September 2013

ConferencesTalk/Lecture Bhaumik S. Dave, Silke Johannsen, Roland K. O. Sigel

METAL-MODIFIED NUCLEIC ACID INTERACTIONS WITH METAL COMPLEXES

Bhaumik S. Dave, Silke Johannsen, Roland K. O. Sigel ConferencesTalk/Lecture

Application of nucleic acids as building blocks of nano-scale devices relies heavily on their inherent self-assembly properties and robust well-defined structural features. Thus nucleic acids are gaining more importance as programmable building blocks in the bottom-up approach.[1] Predictable site-specific functionalization of nucleic acids with metal-ions can be achieved using metal-mediated base pairs. Recent studies show that such modifications of nucleic acids can overcome the lack of sufficient conductivity offered by natural nucleic acids.[2] This is important when considering the application of nucleic acids as nano-scale molecular wires and magnets. Building blocks typically consist of natural nucleosides or artificial nucleosides that are coordinated to a central metal ion.[3] At the same time, metal complex interaction studies with nucleic acids are increasingly important as they are the key to understand the mode-of-action of several novel drugs.

To investigate the electronic properties of metal-modified nucleic acids we aim to set-up charge transfer experiments using metallointercalators as donor-acceptor couple intercalating into metal-modified nucleic acids at specific sites.[4] Our studies incorporate [Ru(bpy)2dppz]2+ and metal-modified nucleic acids with a focus to understand the interaction between the two. We use RNA/DNA duplexes containing continuous stretches of 2, 3 and 6 uracil-uracil/thymine-thymine mismatches that form U-HgII-U/T-HgII-T base pairs upon addition of HgII ions.[5] As a preliminary step towards characterizing the interaction of metallointercalators with our HgII modified nucleic acids, we employ spectroscopic techniques such as UV, Fluorescence, CD and NMR to probe the binding, site preferences, and conformational changes upon binding of [Ru(bpy)2dppz]2+ to our HgII modified nucleic acids.

References

  1. Tanaka, K.; Clever, G. H.; Takezawa, Y.; Yamada, Y.; Kaul, C.; M. Shionoya, Carell, T. Nature Nanotech. 2006, 1, 190-194.
  2. Liu, S.; Clever, G. H.; Takezawa, Y.; Kaneko, M.; Tanaka, K.; Guo, X.; Shionoya, M. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2011, 50, 8886-8890.
  3. Megger, D. A.; Megger, N.; Müller, J. Met. Ions Life Sci. 2012, 10, 295-317.
  4. Murphy, C. J.; Arkin, M. R.; Jenkins, Y.; Ghatlia, N. D.; Bossmann, S.; Turro N. J.; Barton, J. K.Science, 1993, 262, 1025-1029.
  5. Johannsen, S.; Paulus, S.; Düpre, N.; Müller, J.; Sigel, R. K. O. J. Inorg. Biochem. 2008, 102,1141-1151.

Acknowledgements

Financial support by the Swiss National Science Foundation (to SJ and RKOS), the University of Zurich, and the COST Action CM1105 is gratefully acknowledged.

05 Nov 2012

METAL COMPLEX INTERACTIONS WITH METAL-MODIFIED NUCLEIC ACIDS

HONG KONG

6th Asian Biological Inorganic Chemistry Conference, AsBIC, Hong Kong, November 2012.

ConferencesPoster Presentation Bhaumik S. Dave, Silke Johannsen, Roland K. O. Sigel

METAL COMPLEX INTERACTIONS WITH METAL-MODIFIED NUCLEIC ACIDS

Bhaumik S. Dave, Silke Johannsen, Roland K. O. Sigel ConferencesPoster Presentation

Due to the superb self-assembly properties and structural features, nucleic acids are propitious candidates to use as templates to design  nano-scale molecular wires. Incorporation of metal ions in a predictable manner within the structural framework of the nucleic acids is a promising strategy to overcome the lack of sufficient conducting properties of natural nucleic acids.[1] The usage of metal-mediated base pairs is a well-established method to site-specifically insert metal ions into the double helical structure.[2]

Our goal is to investigate the electronic properties of RNA sequences with 2, 3 and 6 consecutive uracil-uracil base pairs that form U-Hg-U base pairs upon addition of HgII ions using well-known DNA intercalator complex [Ru(bpy)2(dppz)]2+ (see Figure).[3] UV melting studies were performed to study the thermal stability of these sequences upon intercalation of [Ru(bpy)2(dppz)]2+. To reveal exact binding affinities of the complex, in the presence and absence of HgII  ions, absorption and emission experiments were carried out. Additional NMR experiments will also help to confirm the intercalation.

Financial support by the Swiss National Science Foundation (to Silke Johannsen and Roland K. O. Sigel) and the University of Zurich is gratefully acknowledged.

[1]  S. Liu; G. H. Clever; Y. Takezawa; M. Kaneko; K. Tanaka; X. Guo; M. Shionoya, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2011, 50, 8886-8890.

[2]  K. Tanaka; M. Shionoya, J. Org. Chem. 1999, 64, 5002-5003.

[3] S. Johannsen; S. Paulus; N. Düpre; J. Müller; R. K. O. Sigel, J. Inorg. Biochem. 2008, 102, 1141-1151.

13 Sep 2012

CHARGE TRANSFER THROUGH METAL-MODIFIED NUCLEIC ACIDS

ZURICH - SWITZERLAND

Poster presentation at the Swiss Chemical Society Fall Meeting, Zurich, September 2012

ConferencesPoster Presentation Bhaumik S. Dave, Silke Johannsen, Roland K. O. Sigel

CHARGE TRANSFER THROUGH METAL-MODIFIED NUCLEIC ACIDS

Bhaumik S. Dave, Silke Johannsen, Roland K. O. Sigel ConferencesPoster Presentation

Application of nucleic acids as building blocks of nano-scale molecular wires takes into consideration the superb self-assembly properties along with their well-defined structural features. Recently, a method for incorpo- rating metal-ions within the structural frame work of nucleic acids in a pre- dictable manner has been established using metal-mediated base pairs.[1]

We aim to set-up charge-transfer experiments of metal-modified RNA by using the well-known DNA light-switch complex [Ru(bpy)2(dppz)]2+. RNA sequences with 2, 3 and 6 consecutive uracil-uracil miss-matched base pairs were transcribed that upon addition of HgII ions, form U-Hg-U base pairs.[2] To investigate the thermal stability of the metal-modified RNA sequences upon intercalation, UV melting studies were carried out. Using absorption and emission experiments, we characterize the intercala- tion of [Ru(bpy)2(dppz)]2+ into our RNA duplexes to reveal exact binding affinities in the presence and absence of HgII ions. Additional NMR experiments will help to confirm the intercalation.

[1] K. Tanaka; M. Shionoya, J. Org. Chem. 1999, 64, 5002-5003.
[2] S. Johannsen; S. Paulus; N. Düpre; J. Müller; R. K. O. Sigel, J. Inorg. Biochem. 2008, 102, 1141-1151.

10 Jul 2009

TOWARDS A MECHANISM OF ACTION OF THE ADAPTOR PROTEIN CIN85: AN INHIBITOR OF PI-3 KINASE

LEIECESTER - UNITED KINGDOM

Dissertation submitted to the Department of Biochemistry, University of Leicester as a part of M.Sc. in Cancer Cell and Molecular Biology

Theses Bhaumik S. Dave

TOWARDS A MECHANISM OF ACTION OF THE ADAPTOR PROTEIN CIN85: AN INHIBITOR OF PI-3 KINASE

Bhaumik S. Dave Theses

It is well known that constitutive up-regulation of PI 3-kinase enzyme and its downstream effector pathway contributes to an un-controlled cell proliferation, cell cycle entry, cell motility, glucose metabolism and evasion of programmed cell death, all of which are important aspects of tumorigenesis. A novel adaptor protein CIN85/Ruk/SETA/CD2BP3 has been known to inhibit the activity of PI 3-kinase by interacting with its regulatory subunit p85α. Recent research suggests that the interaction between CIN85 and p85α is through the various SH3 domains and Proline-rich regions present in both. Multiple domains of this adaptor protein are involved in the interaction with p85α. Due to the high number of Proline-rich regions and SH3 domains, a number of mechanisms through which CIN85 can inhibit p85α can be studied. My aim is to study this interaction and try to establish the mechanism how these domains come together to form the p85α-CIN85 complex by making use of techniques such as recombinant protein production, isothermal titration calorimetry, and NMR spectroscopy. Knowledge from this project will be applied to finally decipher the complete mechanism of PI3-kinase inhibition of the adaptor protein CIN85. From the findings, it is learnt that lone SH3 domain of CIN85 protein is able to open-up the p85α dimer. The findings suggest the existence of CIN85 as a tetramer and a model describing it is proposed. Further confirmations of the same would be able to provide novel insights into the mechanism of interaction of CIN85 and p85α.

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PHOTOGRAPHY

CAMERA CLICKS
Projects number 2
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SWISS EXPERIENCE

SWISS EXPERIENCE

Welcome to my collection of selected photographs of the beautiful Switzerland.

IMG_20160707_123527 IMG_20160707_134314 DSC_0288_3 DSC_0291

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BIRD’S JOURNEY

BIRD’S JOURNEY


  

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